Tag Archives: Pet Relocation

moving with your dogs

Moving with your dogs: make moving day an easy day with these tips!

Moving is a stressful experience, both for us and our dogs. Imagine how it feels among the chaos of boxes and shouting humans for someone who can’t be told what is happening. There is no exact science on how to make moving day seamless, but you can follow these tips to keep your stress levels down and your dog’s anxiety under control.


Have a special dog box
Keeping your pet comfortable during the processes of loading up boxes and moving out belongings means you should have items readily available that your dog will need. Have a dedicated box for your dog’s travel items, including:

  • Dog food
  • Water bowl
  • Favorite toys
  • Familiar bedding
  • Leash
  • Collar
  • Any necessary medication

The bedding and toys will smell like home. When you’re ready to climb into the car, you can readily unpack them and nestle them next to your companion to keep him comforted.


Keep your dog away from the action
Moving day can be overwhelming for a dog watching movers and his family scrambling around to pack boxes and load them onto a moving truck. Consider having someone look after your dog for the day. A pet sitter will cost you between $10 and $65 for the day, depending on your location and what services the sitter offers. You can also recruit a family member or friend to watch him. A loved one may not accept payment for dog sitting, but a thank-you note and a gift card is always a welcome token of thanks!
If your pooch must stay with you on the big day, dedicate a room that they are able to stay in while the chaos ensues. Give them their favorite blanket, some toys, a water bowl and a few treats so they know this is their safe space. Put a sign on the door that says “Do not open” so that strangers in the house (your movers, for example) don’t accidentally open the door and let your dog run out into the uncontrolled environment. Finally, as busy as you might be, check up on your dog regularly during moving day.


Prepare for the drive
The drive is often the most difficult part of moving day. Many dogs are unaccustomed to car rides and will feel anxious during the trip. Make sure you purchase anti-car sickness medication ahead of time. If your pup is especially prone to anxiety, talk to your vet about a sedative that can make the journey as smooth as possible. This type of medication will help your dog relax and feel more at ease with all the activity going on around him.
You should also purchase safe, sturdy travel equipment for your dog, like a harness and seat belt or a crate that can easily be strapped in the car. Barkpost.com suggests that you put together or purchase a doggy first-aid kit as well.


Be cautious upon arrival
When you arrive at your new home, don’t just swing the vehicle doors open and let your dog run out. Make sure you have a plan in place to let him out of the car. He could very easily get overexcited or overwhelmed, make a break for it, and get lost in his new, unfamiliar surroundings. Monitor your dog to watch for any allergies he may develop in his new environment. If you notice your dog is itching or has red skin, he could be allergic to something in or outside the home. If this is the case, your vet may recommend medication or even a diet change.
If you’re able to, hire a maid to deep clean your home before you move in. This will help remove the scents of the people and things that were in the home before, which can be confusing to your fuzzy friend. A prescreening service like HomeAdvisor can help you find trustworthy help in your area so you’ll have one less thing to worry about during your move. For example, a deep cleaning in Anaheim, CA you can expect to pay between $109 and $217. Throughout the process, make sure your family members, your movers, and anybody else lending a hand are on the same page with regards to your dog and his safety. Moving is stressful for people and pooches alike, but with some careful planning, you can make the journey a successful one.

For long distance moves, consider a pet friendly air charter with Pet Jets! Pets fly in the cabin with you which makes your relocation less stressful for you and your pets. Click here for an online quote today!

How Dogs Can Improve Your Mental Health

How Dogs Can Improve Your Mental Health

Our canine companions offer us so much, and they ask for very little in return. However, what you may not know is that your dog is actually able to help boost your mental health as well, and in more ways than you can imagine. How dogs can improve your mental health you might ask? Here are some of the things your dog can do to help you when you are feeling at your worst.

How Dogs Can Improve Your Mental Health

Boosting Your Mood

Aside from simply petting them causing a whole range of positive emotions, the fact that you are able to care for something successfully leaves you with a sense of self-worth and validation. They will get you out to socialise, but they are also there to support you through every emotion.

Calming Stress and Anxiety

Simply being near or stroking your dog releases oxytocin, the hormone responsible for reducing stress, anxiety, blood pressure, and heart rate. This is ideal if you are feeling anxious or on edge as your dog has a calming effect that will leave you feeling more relaxed and at peace than you were before.

Getting You Out and Providing Structure

Mental health issues can lead us to lack any form of structure or organisation in our day, but dogs are able to rectify this. Not only do they make sure we get outside every day to take them on a walk, but you also need to feed them at specific times, play with them, let them outside, and generally care for them.

To Conclude

Hopefully, this has given you a little more insight into the ways your dog may be able to help you reach a better place mentally. However, if you want to learn more, you can read our extensive article on the subject – showing you every way your dog can benefit you, as well as your loved ones. For more helpful articles in regards to pets, bookmark PetJets.com

About the Author

Will is a freelance writer and blogger If you are interested in more information on the benefits of dog ownership including health tips, buyer’s guides and gear reviews, then check out his guides over at Dogowner.co.uk

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How Dogs Can Improve Your Mental Health

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How to Prepare Your Dog for Air Travel

Flying for the first time: How to Prepare Your Dog for Air Travel

how to prepare your dog for air travel

How to prepare your dog for air travel. Imagine this: you’re terrified of everything, you could never grasp the concept of air travel and airplanes no matter how much you try, and not being around your mom and dad scares the living hell out of you. Yes, this is how your dog feels every day, all day.

Dogs are extremely gentle creatures, and as such, they would love nothing more than for you to never leave their side, or even better, if you could all live happily ever after in your backyard where you’re safe. So naturally, if you’re planning to take a faraway trip with your furry compadre, you’re in for a challenge.

Overcoming this particular challenge will require careful planning and preparation, as well as exact execution when the flight day actually comes. The truth is, however, that your dog is not going to love flying no matter how much you train them to handle this stressful ordeal. Nevertheless, you can alleviate the pressure by following these essential steps to flying safely with your pooch.

Determine the best airline and flying option

How to prepare your dog for air travel

Fortunately, an ever-increasing number of airline companies are starting to welcome dogs into their cargo holds and even flight cabins. This means that if you do some digging around, you can find an airline that allows small pets to fly with you in the passenger area.

A great resource where you can find the best pet friendly air charter flights is the Pet Jets  as they can provide free air charter quotes that can give you a comprehensive overview of your flight options and costs, especially if your relocating with your pets.  Remember, not all airlines will offer the same handling service, so you want to make sure you find the best option that will guarantee the safety of your pet, especially if your dog has to fly in a crate.

Assess whether or not your dog is fit to fly

Not all dogs should board an airplane, this should be clearly understood from the get-go. Generally speaking, airline companies do not recommend (and some strictly forbid) puppies under eight weeks old to fly, and the same goes for elderly or sick dogs. Likewise, if you have a short-nosed breed, you might want to refrain from taking the dog with you on your journey, as short-nosed breeds run a significantly higher risk of overheating.

Health conditions aside, your dog also needs to be properly trained to handle the stress of flying. This not only means that the airline is not responsible if your dog starts panicking and tries to hurt itself, it also means that you will be escorted out of the plane if the dog displays aggressive behavior in any way.

Tend to proper crate training well in advance

In order to ensure your dog handles this stressful situation, you will need to tend to proper crate training well before flight date arrives. You want to look for crates and other pet supplies online that will ensure your furry friend is comfortable, has plenty of room, and has plenty of toys to keep occupied during flight. Remember that giving your dog a chew toy will be essential in managing stress and shifting their focus from the “terror” around them onto the toy.

Given the fact that dogs are highly emotional creatures and need constant mental stimulation as well as physical interaction with their owners and humans in general, you will need to find a decent substitute for their time spend in the cargo hold. While there is really nothing that can replace you, a good idea is to cover the floor of the crate with worn clothes or their bed, allowing your pooch to calm down by breathing in your familiar smell.

Follow the proper procedure on flight day

how to prepare your dog for air travel

Come flight day, you not only want to have all of the necessary documentation at the ready so that your dog is boarded without a hitch, but you also want to tend to several crucial steps to make sure your pooch is ready to travel. First, make sure you monitor your dog’s food and water intake.

While you might want to give your dog plenty of satiating food and water, this might not be the best idea. Instead, your dog should not eat prior to flying, and you want to balance their water intake carefully. Secondly, be sure your dog is all worn out before the flight, as exercise is crucial for keeping your dog healthy, happy, and stress-free. Lastly, you want your pooch to go potty just before they board the plane.

Talk to your vet before reaching a decision

how to prepare your dog for air travel

Finally, you should never reach such a decision before first consulting your vet. A veterinarian will be able to tell you whether or not your dog is truly fit to travel, and more importantly, they will be able to prescribe the right sedatives for your dog to take before the flight. Keep in mind that sedating your dog is one of the best pain-free ways for them to muscle through this stressful ordeal.

Dogs and planes don’t go well together; there is no reason to try to convince yourself otherwise. Nevertheless, the entire process needn’t be so excruciating for them if you tend to the proper pre-flight procedures, and take the time to prepare your dog for this challenge several months in advance. Follow the aforementioned steps on how to prepare your dog for air travel and you and your beloved pooch will have no problem having a stress-free flight.

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7 Tips For Moving With Your Dog

7 Tips For Moving With Your Dog

Moving house is a stressful experience for most people. But perhaps even more so for your dog, who doesn’t understand what’s going on.

From the comings and goings of the move itself to living in a new, unfamiliar environment, it’s important to consider your dog’s needs and plan how to approach the situation carefully.

Here are some tips on how to keep your dog calm and happy when you’re moving:

Moving with your dog

1. Get her ready for the journey

Chances are, you’ve got a ride ahead of you, and it could be a long one.

If your dog isn’t used to long car journeys, it will make both of your lives easier if you start to acclimatize her well in advance of the big day.

Dogs should always be secured in the car, either with a seat belt harness or a crate, so you will need to get her used to this, too.

You can start with short trips at first, and gradually increase how long she is in the car by 5 minutes each time.

If her only experience of being in the car has been for a trip to the vets, you will probably need to create a positive association for her.

Take her on trips to the dog park, the forest, and the beach. Seeing that the car has more to offer than an unpleasant check up with the vet will soon make her feel much more comfortable about traveling.

2. Keep up her routine

During a time of disruption and upheaval, it’s important to continue with your dog’s usual routine.

Take her for walks, feed her the dog food she’s used to at the usual time of day, and ensure she has her favorite toys and a sleeping area around her.

This familiarity will help your dog feel more comfortable in a changing environment.

3. Take her to stay with friends or family on moving day

If possible, it’s a good idea to take your dog to stay with friends or family on the day of the move. This will prevent her from getting stressed by constant movement, noises, and unfamiliar people, not to mention keeping her out of harm’s way.

If this is not an option, you can keep her in a closed room in the house. Providing her with water, a comfortable sleeping area and some familiar toys will help her feel less anxious.

Putting these measures in place will not only keep your dog calm but also stop her from getting under everyone’s feet or even running away while people are distracted loading up the moving van.

4. Keep it consistent

Once you have moved into your new home, try not to change her environment too much from the previous one.

For example, if her crate was next to the door in the living room, place the crate in the same position in the new house. Put your dog’s usual bedding inside it and fill it with her favorite toys.

A similar setup and familiar smells will help her settle into her new home much quicker.

5. Ensure she is safe in the new home

Just as packing up can stress out a dog, so can unpacking, especially in an unfamiliar place. So, once you arrive, it’s a good idea to keep her confined to one area as you did when moving from the previous house.

Keeping her out of the way will also prevent her from chewing on or knocking over objects that have yet to be put away.

Moving with your dog

Once you’ve unpacked, you can allow her to sniff and explore her new abode, but you should supervise her at first to ensure the house is safe for her to roam in. This is especially important if you have a yard, as you’ll want to make sure it’s “escape proof.”

Dogs can sometimes try to run back to their old homes. So, until you feel she has fully settled and adapted to her new home and surroundings, keep your dog on the leash when you let her outside or take her for a walk.

6. Stay calm

Dogs very quickly pick up on our feelings, so if you are tense or nervous, it’s likely that your dog will be, too. Packing and moving can indeed be a very stressful experience, but to keep your dog at ease, you need to try to stay as calm as possible.

If you plan thoroughly, you will be prepared and in control, and everything will go smoothly – for you and your dog!

7. Update her tag and microchip

Moving with your dog

While it sounds obvious, updating your dog’s ID tag and microchip could be something you overlook during a busy time. It’s important to do so, especially during a period when your dog could potentially become nervous and get away from you.

While you’re transitioning from house to house, you may want to make a temporary tag with the contact number and address of a friend or family member, just in case.

Conclusion

Dogs can find moving stressful, but by putting measures in place, you can make the transition much smoother for her.

Remember to get her ready to travel in the car well in advance of moving to save you both stress on the big day. When you start the packing and organizing process, keep her calm by continuing with her routine as normal. On moving day, it’s a good idea to take her to stay with a friend or family member, or, if this isn’t possible, confine her to a room in the house with her bed, toys, and water.

Once you’re in the new place, keep her confined to one room as you did when moving from the previous house, and, when you’ve unpacked, supervise her as she explores the new environment. It’s also best to try to set up her crate or sleeping area in the same way as they were to give her a feeling of familiarity.

Lastly, make sure you update her ID tag and microchip with her new address and contact number.

Happy moving!

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