Tag Archives: Dog Flights

How to Prepare Your Dog for Air Travel

Flying for the first time: How to Prepare Your Dog for Air Travel

how to prepare your dog for air travel

How to prepare your dog for air travel. Imagine this: you’re terrified of everything, you could never grasp the concept of air travel and airplanes no matter how much you try, and not being around your mom and dad scares the living hell out of you. Yes, this is how your dog feels every day, all day.

Dogs are extremely gentle creatures, and as such, they would love nothing more than for you to never leave their side, or even better, if you could all live happily ever after in your backyard where you’re safe. So naturally, if you’re planning to take a faraway trip with your furry compadre, you’re in for a challenge.

Overcoming this particular challenge will require careful planning and preparation, as well as exact execution when the flight day actually comes. The truth is, however, that your dog is not going to love flying no matter how much you train them to handle this stressful ordeal. Nevertheless, you can alleviate the pressure by following these essential steps to flying safely with your pooch.

Determine the best airline and flying option

How to prepare your dog for air travel

Fortunately, an ever-increasing number of airline companies are starting to welcome dogs into their cargo holds and even flight cabins. This means that if you do some digging around, you can find an airline that allows small pets to fly with you in the passenger area.

A great resource where you can find the best pet friendly air charter flights is the Pet Jets  as they can provide free air charter quotes that can give you a comprehensive overview of your flight options and costs, especially if your relocating with your pets.  Remember, not all airlines will offer the same handling service, so you want to make sure you find the best option that will guarantee the safety of your pet, especially if your dog has to fly in a crate.

Assess whether or not your dog is fit to fly

Not all dogs should board an airplane, this should be clearly understood from the get-go. Generally speaking, airline companies do not recommend (and some strictly forbid) puppies under eight weeks old to fly, and the same goes for elderly or sick dogs. Likewise, if you have a short-nosed breed, you might want to refrain from taking the dog with you on your journey, as short-nosed breeds run a significantly higher risk of overheating.

Health conditions aside, your dog also needs to be properly trained to handle the stress of flying. This not only means that the airline is not responsible if your dog starts panicking and tries to hurt itself, it also means that you will be escorted out of the plane if the dog displays aggressive behavior in any way.

Tend to proper crate training well in advance

In order to ensure your dog handles this stressful situation, you will need to tend to proper crate training well before flight date arrives. You want to look for crates and other pet supplies online that will ensure your furry friend is comfortable, has plenty of room, and has plenty of toys to keep occupied during flight. Remember that giving your dog a chew toy will be essential in managing stress and shifting their focus from the “terror” around them onto the toy.

Given the fact that dogs are highly emotional creatures and need constant mental stimulation as well as physical interaction with their owners and humans in general, you will need to find a decent substitute for their time spend in the cargo hold. While there is really nothing that can replace you, a good idea is to cover the floor of the crate with worn clothes or their bed, allowing your pooch to calm down by breathing in your familiar smell.

Follow the proper procedure on flight day

how to prepare your dog for air travel

Come flight day, you not only want to have all of the necessary documentation at the ready so that your dog is boarded without a hitch, but you also want to tend to several crucial steps to make sure your pooch is ready to travel. First, make sure you monitor your dog’s food and water intake.

While you might want to give your dog plenty of satiating food and water, this might not be the best idea. Instead, your dog should not eat prior to flying, and you want to balance their water intake carefully. Secondly, be sure your dog is all worn out before the flight, as exercise is crucial for keeping your dog healthy, happy, and stress-free. Lastly, you want your pooch to go potty just before they board the plane.

Talk to your vet before reaching a decision

how to prepare your dog for air travel

Finally, you should never reach such a decision before first consulting your vet. A veterinarian will be able to tell you whether or not your dog is truly fit to travel, and more importantly, they will be able to prescribe the right sedatives for your dog to take before the flight. Keep in mind that sedating your dog is one of the best pain-free ways for them to muscle through this stressful ordeal.

Dogs and planes don’t go well together; there is no reason to try to convince yourself otherwise. Nevertheless, the entire process needn’t be so excruciating for them if you tend to the proper pre-flight procedures, and take the time to prepare your dog for this challenge several months in advance. Follow the aforementioned steps on how to prepare your dog for air travel and you and your beloved pooch will have no problem having a stress-free flight.

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Dog crate

What Size Dog Crate Do You Need To Fly With Your Pets?

What size dog crate do you need to Fly with your pets? Some suggestions from Pet Jets!

Crate training is a popular way to potty train a new dog, keep your belongings safe from dogs that love to chew, and save your counters from dogs that “help themselves” to your food. That’s why the right size crate is one of your most important pet supplies for new dog owners.

When trained right, a crate is a pleasant, safe space for your dog to sleep while you’re away at work. Before taking the plunge into crate training though, you might ask: “What size crate do I need?”

You won’t be surprised to hear that the answer depends on you and your dog. When researching what size crate you need, be sure to remember that these are general guidelines and will change depending on your dog.

In general, a dog crate needs to be tall enough for your dog to stand and wide enough for your dog to turn around easily – but not much bigger.

We’ll get more into the specifics of choosing the right size dog crate in a bit. Just remember that bigger isn’t always better.


Selecting the right size crate will help make sure that your dog feels at home in her new crate!

Why is it important to get the right size dog crate?

Depending on what you’re using your dog crate for, picking the right size crate is the most important part of selecting a crate. If you are using the crate as a tool to help with potty training, the right size crate is absolutely important. However, if you are using the crate to just keep your dog contained, it won’t hurt to get a bigger crate.

Let’s break this down a bit more.

The reason that a crate is helpful when potty training your dog is that it taps into your dog’s instincts to not want to soil her “den.” Your dog will instinctively hold it until you release her from the crate, letting you control when and where she relieves herself. However this won’t work if your crate is too big.

Pick the right size dog crate when potty training to reduce the stress of owning a new dog. This will help you reap all of the amazing benefits of owning a pet without the stress of messy carpets!

If you want to potty train your dog using a crate, your crate must be big enough to be comfortable, but not big enough for your dog to designate a “potty side” and a “sleeping side.”

If your crate is too big, your dog will quickly learn to pee in one corner and sleep in another. Once a dog learns to pee in her crate, it’s much harder to effectively potty train her. That’s why potty training dogs from puppy mill situations is so hard.

On the other hand, some people use crates just to keep their stuff safe from their dogs. That’s why I crate my four year old dog when we have guests or are traveling. I don’t trust my guests or my hosts to properly store all of their food – so I leave my dog in a crate while we’re away. This saves us from vet visits (my dog thinks of himself as a chocolate connoisseur, a dangerous profession for a dog).

If you’re like me and just want to crate your dog for safety of your dog or your stuff, pick a larger sized crate. You might even want to look into using baby gates or an x pen setup, if your dog won’t jump over them.


The right size dog crate will help your pup feel right at home sleeping in the crate while you’re at work.

What sort of dog crates are out there?

Now that you understand the importance of picking the right size crate, let’s look at a few of your options for purchasing a dog crate. Keep in mind that you should always line your dog crate with a nice bed to keep your pup comfy. There are four main types of dog crates out there:

Wire or metal dog crates. These crates are the most common crates on the market. They are basically a wire cage for your dog. They fold down nicely and come in a variety of sizes. Most dogs will be happier in a wire dog crate with a blanket thrown over the top for some darkness, rather than being contained in a crate out in the open. Metal crates are my go-to for everyday use. They come in a huge range of sizes, which makes picking the right size crate a bit difficult!

Best for: foldable everyday use.

Plastic dog crates. Plastic dog crates don’t fold down to a small size like wire crates, but they have solid walls that keep the dog feeling safe and cozy. They come in a variety of sizes and can be quite sturdy. These crates are great for everyday use.

Best for: keeping your dog cozy every day.


It only took my dog Barley about 20 minutes to figure out how to break out of his fabric crate, despite sleeping in his metal crate almost every day.

Soft carriers. There are a variety of soft dog crates out there, ranging from foldable fabric crates that dog sport competitors use while traveling to over-the-shoulder sling bags for smaller dogs. They are not meant for everyday use as many dogs can (and will) easily escape by tearing through the mesh or fabric.

Best for: temporary crates and travel.

Decorative dog crates. More and more dog crates now come in stylish versions that look like end tables or wicker baskets. If your dog is already comfortable in the crate, you can transition to a decorative crate for everyday use. However, most dogs can easily escape from a decorative crate and they should not be used until your dog is comfortable in the crate.

Best for: well-trained dogs and stylish owners.

Think about your main goals when deciding what type of dog crate to purchase. It’s smart to start with either a metal or plastic crate at first, then slowly transition to a decorative or soft crate. As mentioned above, even well-trained dogs can easily escape from the soft crate options.


A well-sized dog crate will keep your floors safe from puppy accidents and help you teach your puppy to go potty outside.

What size dog crate do I need?

In general, you want a crate that’s not much taller than your dog. Your dog should easily be able to turn around and stretch out while sleeping, but the crate shouldn’t be much bigger than that.

Most crates are sized according to your dog’s weight and height at the shoulder. Before driving to the pet store or hopping onto Amazon, be sure to measure your dog’s height at the shoulder and weigh her.

If you don’t know your dog’s height and weight, you can weigh yourself on a bathroom scale first. Then pick up your dog and weigh yourself again. Then subtract the difference, and you’ll have your dog’s weight. Please don’t do this if your dog is uncomfortable being picked up or your dog is so big that you’ll hurt yourself picking her up.


A tape measure is the easiest way to measure your dog, ensuring you pick the right size dog crate.

To measure your dog’s height, either use a tape measure or estimate by putting a small piece of tape on your leg where your dog’s shoulder ends. Then use the long edge of a standard piece of paper. The edge of the paper is 11 inches, which will give you an accurate enough estimate to pick the right size crate.


Long and leggy Salukis might need a bigger crate than other dogs of the same weight.

Use both estimates to find the right size crate, especially if your dog is an extreme body shape. Otherwise, use height as your main indicator for picking the right size crate. For example, a long and leggy Saluki might need a bigger crate for a dog her weight than an Australian Shepherd of the same weight. Likewise, a stocky Bulldog might not need as big of a crate as a Labrador that weighs the same amount.

Each of the most popular dog breeds in the world is a bit different, so don’t blindly follow guidelines on how to pick the right size crate.

In general, select a crate that is at least 6 inches taller than your dog.

Crates generally just come in about five sizes, so don’t stress too much about precision when asking what size crate you need. Many metal crates now come with an adjustable wall, allowing you to make the crate a bit bigger or smaller while your dog grows.

Always follow manufacturer guidelines when choosing what size crate you need. Here are some sample crate sizes and the height/weight of dogs that will fit in them to get you started when figuring out what size crate you need:

Crate Height Dog Weight Dog Height at Shoulders
18-24 inches Under 25 pounds* 18 inches or shorter
30 inches 26-40 pounds* 24 inches or shorter
36 inches 41-70 pounds* 30 inches or shorter
42 inches 71-90 pounds* 36 inches or shorter
48 inches 91-110 pounds* 42 inches or shorter
54 inches 110 pounds + 48 inches or shorter

* Remember to look at the height of your dog first when asking what size crate you need. For example, my border collie weighs 50 pounds – but he uses a 42 inch crate because he’s so leggy!

If your dog is taller than 48 inches, you might spend some time looking for a crate to find the perfect giant-sized crate for your dog.


Short-legged dogs might still need a long crate, so be sure to triple-check measurements if your dog has extra-short legs!

How do I teach my dog to love her crate?

Proper crate training is important if you want to use your new properly-sized dog crate. Rather than just shoving your dog into the crate and letting her “cry it out,” your mission is to turn the crate into a super-awesome place to be.

There are lots of amazing resources out there on how to crate train your dog. But for now, here are a few quick dirty tips on how to teach your dog to love her crate:

  • Make the crate comfy. Spruce up your new dog crate with a comfy bed. Keep it relatively dark by tossing a towel over the top.
  • Feed meals in the crate. Once the crate is comfy, start to feed your dog her super tasty and nutritious dog food inside the crate. You can start with the door open, then start closing the door. Let her out when she’s done.
  • Hide surprise treats in the crate. At first, you can just covertly place treats inside the crate. Your dog will learn to check out the crate to find awesome things like bully sticks, peanut-butter stuffed kongs, and bits of cheese or lunch meat.
  • Play some crate games. Once your dog is comfy eating her meals in the crate and is used to going into the crate to find tasty treats, you can start playing some “crate games.” Sit near the crate with some treats. When your dog looks at the crate, praise her and toss a treat into the crate. As long as she’s in the crate, keep feeding her. If she comes right out, that’s ok. Repeatedly praise her and toss treats inside the crate for her to eat. Eventually build up to closing the crate door for short amounts of time.
  • Go slowly. Don’t just close your dog in the crate and leave for work for the day. This is super stressful for your dog and won’t help teach her to like the crate. Slowly build from your dog eating her dinner in the crate with the door open, to you leaving the room while she’s closed in the crate, to leaving the house, to going to work. Rushing crate training might send you right back to square one!

Use lots of treats to teach your dog to love her new properly-sized crate.

Picking out the right size crate is key to your success when using a crate to potty train your dog or keep your dog safe while you’re at work. Select the right size crate to ensure that your dog is comfortable and relaxed while you’re away.

Pet Jets Travel Club

Pet Jets Travel Club – Share a Pet Friendly Air Charter!

Pet Jets Travel Club

Pet Jets Travel Club

In response to the latest news that a major international airline is no longer taking reservations to fly pets in cargo, Pet Jets has received a significant increase in inquires for pet friendly air charters. While the cost of air charter can significantly be higher than the cost of airline flights, air charter offers a great solution for relocation or vacation flights. Many inquiries find that pet owners require a large jet for their flight that can be cost prohibitive . For example,  from the west coast of the U.S. to Hawaii, a large private jet is required for the flight, but many of our inquiries only have a small party of two or three passengers with one pet leaving ample space on the aircraft for another similar party to share the flight and cost. Pet Jets Travel Club was created to offer an opportunity to lower the cost by half by providing an opportunity to network with other pet owners to simply share a flight. To meet this need, Pet Jets has a member only section of their website for Pet Jets Travel Club members as well as a private facebook group page for members to post their flight requests and network. Once you find another party to share a flight, Pet Jets assist with finding the best aircraft at the best price to assist with arranging your pet friendly air charter. Pet Jets Travel Club provides the opportunity to reduce the cost of private air charter at a time when pet owners who don’t want their pets to fly in cargo or can’t find air transportation solutions for relocation or travel. Visit PetJets.com for more information!

Dog

Thinking of Traveling With Your Dog? Here are 5 Dog-Friendly Countries to Consider

Dogs, just like humans are your friends and the least they want from you is to feel wanted or a sense of belonging. Besides eating together, your dog will have the time and appreciate the love and friendship you share when you include them in your travel plans. So, where are you traveling to next? Have you gone through the dog culture at your travel destination? Do you have your dogs and your travel documents? And, how will you reach your destination? Having these in mind is important if you don’t want to leave your dog with your babysitter.

If you are like most of us, you die a little every time you leave your dog whining, don’t you? Well, then, let’s take a look at some of the dog-friendly countries you and your furry friend should tour:

1.     France

France is a magical travel destination that offers the best sights and sounds, as well as food. But, that isn’t all. It is the nation of dog lovers – no wonder the French are always happy! On your first trip, you’ll most probably see several canines walking down the streets. You will also spot a few resident dogs napping at shop counters, markets, cafes, and even bars.

2.     Austria

Going to central Europe soon? Make your destination Austria. This country is a popular travel destination although it is commonly overlooked due to its beautiful neighbor Germany. Austria’s dog-friendliness means that you will have the best outdoor experience walking and swimming in the pristine lakes and hiking the scenic Austria hills. All you have to remember if you are planning to take a scenic hike is to get adequate protection for your dog’s paw because of the rocky landscape.

But that isn’t all, Austria is among the best dog-friendly countries, and it has some of the most progressive animal rights laws. Pet stores do not sell dogs and cats, and there are some training accessories deemed harmful to pets. So, in Austria, you will be on the wrong side of the law if you give your pooch shock collars or install invisible containment systems. Austria has several dog-friendly hotels and holiday inns.

3.     Hungary

If you are looking for an alternative destination to Austria, go to Hungary. There, dogs are part of the family, and there are strict dog protection laws to protect your furry friend. Hungary requires you to microchip your dog as a resident, and for the dog’s protection, tail docking isn’t allowed.

You will get to walk through Hungary’s beautiful historic city centers of Budapest. Dogs are welcome in parks, restaurants, and hotels. Some parts don’t require leashing as long as your dog recognizes voice commands.

4.     Sweden

This picturesque country will be home to you and your pup in the next few days if you make your travel plans now. The climate is ideal for your pup in the warmer months and dogs are allowed in public transport. In some parts of Sweden, you will come across food bowls and water dishes for pets. So, get ready to explore the rugged coastline or the sites in the modern-day Stockholm.

5.     Great Britain

This is an advanced country that makes dogs and pets feel protected. Pets are welcome in trains across the country, and you can easily plan your trip with your dog. With your dog, you can discover the most amazing historical treasures like medieval castles, prehistoric sites, and ancient forests. How about a chance to visit Wales, England, Northern Ireland, as well as Scotland? You just may get back home with an accent!

Author Bio

This post was contributed by Pete Decker, the Lead Editor at The Goody Pet. Pete loves to share his passion for pets through snippets of interesting and helpful information. You can find more of Pete at his website, Twitter or Facebook.