Category Archives: Pet Tips

How to Prepare Your Dog for Air Travel

Flying for the first time: How to Prepare Your Dog for Air Travel

how to prepare your dog for air travel

How to prepare your dog for air travel. Imagine this: you’re terrified of everything, you could never grasp the concept of air travel and airplanes no matter how much you try, and not being around your mom and dad scares the living hell out of you. Yes, this is how your dog feels every day, all day.

Dogs are extremely gentle creatures, and as such, they would love nothing more than for you to never leave their side, or even better, if you could all live happily ever after in your backyard where you’re safe. So naturally, if you’re planning to take a faraway trip with your furry compadre, you’re in for a challenge.

Overcoming this particular challenge will require careful planning and preparation, as well as exact execution when the flight day actually comes. The truth is, however, that your dog is not going to love flying no matter how much you train them to handle this stressful ordeal. Nevertheless, you can alleviate the pressure by following these essential steps to flying safely with your pooch.

Determine the best airline and flying option

How to prepare your dog for air travel

Fortunately, an ever-increasing number of airline companies are starting to welcome dogs into their cargo holds and even flight cabins. This means that if you do some digging around, you can find an airline that allows small pets to fly with you in the passenger area.

A great resource where you can find the best pet friendly air charter flights is the Pet Jets  as they can provide free air charter quotes that can give you a comprehensive overview of your flight options and costs, especially if your relocating with your pets.  Remember, not all airlines will offer the same handling service, so you want to make sure you find the best option that will guarantee the safety of your pet, especially if your dog has to fly in a crate.

Assess whether or not your dog is fit to fly

Not all dogs should board an airplane, this should be clearly understood from the get-go. Generally speaking, airline companies do not recommend (and some strictly forbid) puppies under eight weeks old to fly, and the same goes for elderly or sick dogs. Likewise, if you have a short-nosed breed, you might want to refrain from taking the dog with you on your journey, as short-nosed breeds run a significantly higher risk of overheating.

Health conditions aside, your dog also needs to be properly trained to handle the stress of flying. This not only means that the airline is not responsible if your dog starts panicking and tries to hurt itself, it also means that you will be escorted out of the plane if the dog displays aggressive behavior in any way.

Tend to proper crate training well in advance

In order to ensure your dog handles this stressful situation, you will need to tend to proper crate training well before flight date arrives. You want to look for crates and other pet supplies online that will ensure your furry friend is comfortable, has plenty of room, and has plenty of toys to keep occupied during flight. Remember that giving your dog a chew toy will be essential in managing stress and shifting their focus from the “terror” around them onto the toy.

Given the fact that dogs are highly emotional creatures and need constant mental stimulation as well as physical interaction with their owners and humans in general, you will need to find a decent substitute for their time spend in the cargo hold. While there is really nothing that can replace you, a good idea is to cover the floor of the crate with worn clothes or their bed, allowing your pooch to calm down by breathing in your familiar smell.

Follow the proper procedure on flight day

how to prepare your dog for air travel

Come flight day, you not only want to have all of the necessary documentation at the ready so that your dog is boarded without a hitch, but you also want to tend to several crucial steps to make sure your pooch is ready to travel. First, make sure you monitor your dog’s food and water intake.

While you might want to give your dog plenty of satiating food and water, this might not be the best idea. Instead, your dog should not eat prior to flying, and you want to balance their water intake carefully. Secondly, be sure your dog is all worn out before the flight, as exercise is crucial for keeping your dog healthy, happy, and stress-free. Lastly, you want your pooch to go potty just before they board the plane.

Talk to your vet before reaching a decision

how to prepare your dog for air travel

Finally, you should never reach such a decision before first consulting your vet. A veterinarian will be able to tell you whether or not your dog is truly fit to travel, and more importantly, they will be able to prescribe the right sedatives for your dog to take before the flight. Keep in mind that sedating your dog is one of the best pain-free ways for them to muscle through this stressful ordeal.

Dogs and planes don’t go well together; there is no reason to try to convince yourself otherwise. Nevertheless, the entire process needn’t be so excruciating for them if you tend to the proper pre-flight procedures, and take the time to prepare your dog for this challenge several months in advance. Follow the aforementioned steps on how to prepare your dog for air travel and you and your beloved pooch will have no problem having a stress-free flight.

Brain Training For Dogs – Unique Dog Training Course! 

Click Here!

Dog crate

What Size Dog Crate Do You Need To Fly With Your Pets?

What size dog crate do you need to Fly with your pets? Some suggestions from Pet Jets!

Crate training is a popular way to potty train a new dog, keep your belongings safe from dogs that love to chew, and save your counters from dogs that “help themselves” to your food. That’s why the right size crate is one of your most important pet supplies for new dog owners.

When trained right, a crate is a pleasant, safe space for your dog to sleep while you’re away at work. Before taking the plunge into crate training though, you might ask: “What size crate do I need?”

You won’t be surprised to hear that the answer depends on you and your dog. When researching what size crate you need, be sure to remember that these are general guidelines and will change depending on your dog.

In general, a dog crate needs to be tall enough for your dog to stand and wide enough for your dog to turn around easily – but not much bigger.

We’ll get more into the specifics of choosing the right size dog crate in a bit. Just remember that bigger isn’t always better.


Selecting the right size crate will help make sure that your dog feels at home in her new crate!

Why is it important to get the right size dog crate?

Depending on what you’re using your dog crate for, picking the right size crate is the most important part of selecting a crate. If you are using the crate as a tool to help with potty training, the right size crate is absolutely important. However, if you are using the crate to just keep your dog contained, it won’t hurt to get a bigger crate.

Let’s break this down a bit more.

The reason that a crate is helpful when potty training your dog is that it taps into your dog’s instincts to not want to soil her “den.” Your dog will instinctively hold it until you release her from the crate, letting you control when and where she relieves herself. However this won’t work if your crate is too big.

Pick the right size dog crate when potty training to reduce the stress of owning a new dog. This will help you reap all of the amazing benefits of owning a pet without the stress of messy carpets!

If you want to potty train your dog using a crate, your crate must be big enough to be comfortable, but not big enough for your dog to designate a “potty side” and a “sleeping side.”

If your crate is too big, your dog will quickly learn to pee in one corner and sleep in another. Once a dog learns to pee in her crate, it’s much harder to effectively potty train her. That’s why potty training dogs from puppy mill situations is so hard.

On the other hand, some people use crates just to keep their stuff safe from their dogs. That’s why I crate my four year old dog when we have guests or are traveling. I don’t trust my guests or my hosts to properly store all of their food – so I leave my dog in a crate while we’re away. This saves us from vet visits (my dog thinks of himself as a chocolate connoisseur, a dangerous profession for a dog).

If you’re like me and just want to crate your dog for safety of your dog or your stuff, pick a larger sized crate. You might even want to look into using baby gates or an x pen setup, if your dog won’t jump over them.


The right size dog crate will help your pup feel right at home sleeping in the crate while you’re at work.

What sort of dog crates are out there?

Now that you understand the importance of picking the right size crate, let’s look at a few of your options for purchasing a dog crate. Keep in mind that you should always line your dog crate with a nice bed to keep your pup comfy. There are four main types of dog crates out there:

Wire or metal dog crates. These crates are the most common crates on the market. They are basically a wire cage for your dog. They fold down nicely and come in a variety of sizes. Most dogs will be happier in a wire dog crate with a blanket thrown over the top for some darkness, rather than being contained in a crate out in the open. Metal crates are my go-to for everyday use. They come in a huge range of sizes, which makes picking the right size crate a bit difficult!

Best for: foldable everyday use.

Plastic dog crates. Plastic dog crates don’t fold down to a small size like wire crates, but they have solid walls that keep the dog feeling safe and cozy. They come in a variety of sizes and can be quite sturdy. These crates are great for everyday use.

Best for: keeping your dog cozy every day.


It only took my dog Barley about 20 minutes to figure out how to break out of his fabric crate, despite sleeping in his metal crate almost every day.

Soft carriers. There are a variety of soft dog crates out there, ranging from foldable fabric crates that dog sport competitors use while traveling to over-the-shoulder sling bags for smaller dogs. They are not meant for everyday use as many dogs can (and will) easily escape by tearing through the mesh or fabric.

Best for: temporary crates and travel.

Decorative dog crates. More and more dog crates now come in stylish versions that look like end tables or wicker baskets. If your dog is already comfortable in the crate, you can transition to a decorative crate for everyday use. However, most dogs can easily escape from a decorative crate and they should not be used until your dog is comfortable in the crate.

Best for: well-trained dogs and stylish owners.

Think about your main goals when deciding what type of dog crate to purchase. It’s smart to start with either a metal or plastic crate at first, then slowly transition to a decorative or soft crate. As mentioned above, even well-trained dogs can easily escape from the soft crate options.


A well-sized dog crate will keep your floors safe from puppy accidents and help you teach your puppy to go potty outside.

What size dog crate do I need?

In general, you want a crate that’s not much taller than your dog. Your dog should easily be able to turn around and stretch out while sleeping, but the crate shouldn’t be much bigger than that.

Most crates are sized according to your dog’s weight and height at the shoulder. Before driving to the pet store or hopping onto Amazon, be sure to measure your dog’s height at the shoulder and weigh her.

If you don’t know your dog’s height and weight, you can weigh yourself on a bathroom scale first. Then pick up your dog and weigh yourself again. Then subtract the difference, and you’ll have your dog’s weight. Please don’t do this if your dog is uncomfortable being picked up or your dog is so big that you’ll hurt yourself picking her up.


A tape measure is the easiest way to measure your dog, ensuring you pick the right size dog crate.

To measure your dog’s height, either use a tape measure or estimate by putting a small piece of tape on your leg where your dog’s shoulder ends. Then use the long edge of a standard piece of paper. The edge of the paper is 11 inches, which will give you an accurate enough estimate to pick the right size crate.


Long and leggy Salukis might need a bigger crate than other dogs of the same weight.

Use both estimates to find the right size crate, especially if your dog is an extreme body shape. Otherwise, use height as your main indicator for picking the right size crate. For example, a long and leggy Saluki might need a bigger crate for a dog her weight than an Australian Shepherd of the same weight. Likewise, a stocky Bulldog might not need as big of a crate as a Labrador that weighs the same amount.

Each of the most popular dog breeds in the world is a bit different, so don’t blindly follow guidelines on how to pick the right size crate.

In general, select a crate that is at least 6 inches taller than your dog.

Crates generally just come in about five sizes, so don’t stress too much about precision when asking what size crate you need. Many metal crates now come with an adjustable wall, allowing you to make the crate a bit bigger or smaller while your dog grows.

Always follow manufacturer guidelines when choosing what size crate you need. Here are some sample crate sizes and the height/weight of dogs that will fit in them to get you started when figuring out what size crate you need:

Crate Height Dog Weight Dog Height at Shoulders
18-24 inches Under 25 pounds* 18 inches or shorter
30 inches 26-40 pounds* 24 inches or shorter
36 inches 41-70 pounds* 30 inches or shorter
42 inches 71-90 pounds* 36 inches or shorter
48 inches 91-110 pounds* 42 inches or shorter
54 inches 110 pounds + 48 inches or shorter

* Remember to look at the height of your dog first when asking what size crate you need. For example, my border collie weighs 50 pounds – but he uses a 42 inch crate because he’s so leggy!

If your dog is taller than 48 inches, you might spend some time looking for a crate to find the perfect giant-sized crate for your dog.


Short-legged dogs might still need a long crate, so be sure to triple-check measurements if your dog has extra-short legs!

How do I teach my dog to love her crate?

Proper crate training is important if you want to use your new properly-sized dog crate. Rather than just shoving your dog into the crate and letting her “cry it out,” your mission is to turn the crate into a super-awesome place to be.

There are lots of amazing resources out there on how to crate train your dog. But for now, here are a few quick dirty tips on how to teach your dog to love her crate:

  • Make the crate comfy. Spruce up your new dog crate with a comfy bed. Keep it relatively dark by tossing a towel over the top.
  • Feed meals in the crate. Once the crate is comfy, start to feed your dog her super tasty and nutritious dog food inside the crate. You can start with the door open, then start closing the door. Let her out when she’s done.
  • Hide surprise treats in the crate. At first, you can just covertly place treats inside the crate. Your dog will learn to check out the crate to find awesome things like bully sticks, peanut-butter stuffed kongs, and bits of cheese or lunch meat.
  • Play some crate games. Once your dog is comfy eating her meals in the crate and is used to going into the crate to find tasty treats, you can start playing some “crate games.” Sit near the crate with some treats. When your dog looks at the crate, praise her and toss a treat into the crate. As long as she’s in the crate, keep feeding her. If she comes right out, that’s ok. Repeatedly praise her and toss treats inside the crate for her to eat. Eventually build up to closing the crate door for short amounts of time.
  • Go slowly. Don’t just close your dog in the crate and leave for work for the day. This is super stressful for your dog and won’t help teach her to like the crate. Slowly build from your dog eating her dinner in the crate with the door open, to you leaving the room while she’s closed in the crate, to leaving the house, to going to work. Rushing crate training might send you right back to square one!

Use lots of treats to teach your dog to love her new properly-sized crate.

Picking out the right size crate is key to your success when using a crate to potty train your dog or keep your dog safe while you’re at work. Select the right size crate to ensure that your dog is comfortable and relaxed while you’re away.

dog travel

Owner Question: When Is The Best Time To Feed My Dog?

Have you ever thought about when the best time of day to feed your dog is?

Some pet owners believe that it simply doesn’t matter. Food is food, right? Others, like myself, find that it’s important to set up a good system of when you will feed your dog to make sure they can make the most of their meals.
I recently received a question about feeding times from a concerned owner who only feeds their dog one time per day. While there may be nothing wrong with feeding once per day, there is some info out there that suggests owners should do otherwise. Let’s break down the facts and figure out what to do about feeding times!

The Controversy: One Or Two Times Per Day

The main point of conflict that comes up when people discuss the best time to feed their dogs is whether or not you should feed your dog two times per day. Some people even put their dog’s food out all day long, which is called “free feeding.”

In most cases, you should feed your dog two times per day. By doing so, you are helping their digestive system work more effectively, and you are ensuring that their energy will remain consistent throughout the whole day.

If you only feed your dog in the morning, their digestive system might be weighed down by too much food at one time, and they won’t be able to process the food as efficiently. Feeding half the amount in two controlled portions will help your dog live healthier.

One big exception to this is puppies. Puppies should eat three times per day in smaller portions to help them gain weight properly and to help their digestive system develop. Feeding them at specific times will also help you to train them more efficiently.

So, what is the best way to feed?

There is no “right” or “wrong” answer, but I recommend following these guidelines to decide if you should allow your dog to free feed or if you should feed them a set number of times per day.

Free feeding: This is recommended for nursing dogs who need a constant supply of calories and for highly active dogs that need to replenish their calories throughout the day. If you have a dog that lays around most of the day or is diabetic, do not do this.

Control Portions: This is the best method to feed your dog, particularly if they are the type that will eat anything you put in front of them and would quickly get obese while free feeding. The best way to control portions is to feed your dog two times a day at about 8 to 12 hour intervals.

What Time Should I Feed My Dog?

If you are feeding your dog one time per day, you should feed them in the morning, but feeding them two times a day is probably better for them so that they do not get hungry by the end of the day.

If you are feeding two times per day, feed your dogs once in the morning when you both get up and again between 8 and 12 hours later. Keep the timing consistent from day to day, as your dog’s body will become accustomed to eating at a certain time.

Consider These Conditions…

There are some cases where you may want to change how you are feeding your dog and how much you are feeding them. If any of the following cases happens to your dog, adjust their diet and meal times appropriately:

  • Diagnosed with a food related condition; may need to set specific meal times to manage it
  • Dog becomes more active; may need to feed them more times per day or free feed
  • Weather is very hot or cold; their bodies may need more food at each meal time to regulate their temperature
  • Recovering from surgery; may need to eat a specific diet
  • Pregnant or nursing; will need to eat more throughout the day

It’s important to always adjust how much your dog eats and when they are eating to fit their current lifestyle. If your dog always seems hungry but is gaining weight, you may even need to change their food to a high-quality, filling dog food (here are some reviews) that will keep them from being hungry all the time.

Consistency Is Key

As you can see, there can be arguments made for or against feeding your dog two times instead of one time per day. Every dog is different, so you should make your choices based on your dog’s particular needs and preferences.

No matter when you choose to feed your dog, consistency is key. The best time to feed your dog is at the same time you feed them every other day! To create a proper feeding routine, you should always feed at the same meal time. This will help your dog’s body digest more regularly and set good expectations for your dog’s meal time.

Do you feed your dog one or two times per day? Let us know what your preference is; after all, every dog’s situation demands a unique approach!

 

7 Tips For Moving With Your Dog

7 Tips For Moving With Your Dog

Moving house is a stressful experience for most people. But perhaps even more so for your dog, who doesn’t understand what’s going on.

From the comings and goings of the move itself to living in a new, unfamiliar environment, it’s important to consider your dog’s needs and plan how to approach the situation carefully.

Here are some tips on how to keep your dog calm and happy when you’re moving:

Moving with your dog

1. Get her ready for the journey

Chances are, you’ve got a ride ahead of you, and it could be a long one.

If your dog isn’t used to long car journeys, it will make both of your lives easier if you start to acclimatize her well in advance of the big day.

Dogs should always be secured in the car, either with a seat belt harness or a crate, so you will need to get her used to this, too.

You can start with short trips at first, and gradually increase how long she is in the car by 5 minutes each time.

If her only experience of being in the car has been for a trip to the vets, you will probably need to create a positive association for her.

Take her on trips to the dog park, the forest, and the beach. Seeing that the car has more to offer than an unpleasant check up with the vet will soon make her feel much more comfortable about traveling.

2. Keep up her routine

During a time of disruption and upheaval, it’s important to continue with your dog’s usual routine.

Take her for walks, feed her the dog food she’s used to at the usual time of day, and ensure she has her favorite toys and a sleeping area around her.

This familiarity will help your dog feel more comfortable in a changing environment.

3. Take her to stay with friends or family on moving day

If possible, it’s a good idea to take your dog to stay with friends or family on the day of the move. This will prevent her from getting stressed by constant movement, noises, and unfamiliar people, not to mention keeping her out of harm’s way.

If this is not an option, you can keep her in a closed room in the house. Providing her with water, a comfortable sleeping area and some familiar toys will help her feel less anxious.

Putting these measures in place will not only keep your dog calm but also stop her from getting under everyone’s feet or even running away while people are distracted loading up the moving van.

4. Keep it consistent

Once you have moved into your new home, try not to change her environment too much from the previous one.

For example, if her crate was next to the door in the living room, place the crate in the same position in the new house. Put your dog’s usual bedding inside it and fill it with her favorite toys.

A similar setup and familiar smells will help her settle into her new home much quicker.

5. Ensure she is safe in the new home

Just as packing up can stress out a dog, so can unpacking, especially in an unfamiliar place. So, once you arrive, it’s a good idea to keep her confined to one area as you did when moving from the previous house.

Keeping her out of the way will also prevent her from chewing on or knocking over objects that have yet to be put away.

Moving with your dog

Once you’ve unpacked, you can allow her to sniff and explore her new abode, but you should supervise her at first to ensure the house is safe for her to roam in. This is especially important if you have a yard, as you’ll want to make sure it’s “escape proof.”

Dogs can sometimes try to run back to their old homes. So, until you feel she has fully settled and adapted to her new home and surroundings, keep your dog on the leash when you let her outside or take her for a walk.

6. Stay calm

Dogs very quickly pick up on our feelings, so if you are tense or nervous, it’s likely that your dog will be, too. Packing and moving can indeed be a very stressful experience, but to keep your dog at ease, you need to try to stay as calm as possible.

If you plan thoroughly, you will be prepared and in control, and everything will go smoothly – for you and your dog!

7. Update her tag and microchip

Moving with your dog

While it sounds obvious, updating your dog’s ID tag and microchip could be something you overlook during a busy time. It’s important to do so, especially during a period when your dog could potentially become nervous and get away from you.

While you’re transitioning from house to house, you may want to make a temporary tag with the contact number and address of a friend or family member, just in case.

Conclusion

Dogs can find moving stressful, but by putting measures in place, you can make the transition much smoother for her.

Remember to get her ready to travel in the car well in advance of moving to save you both stress on the big day. When you start the packing and organizing process, keep her calm by continuing with her routine as normal. On moving day, it’s a good idea to take her to stay with a friend or family member, or, if this isn’t possible, confine her to a room in the house with her bed, toys, and water.

Once you’re in the new place, keep her confined to one room as you did when moving from the previous house, and, when you’ve unpacked, supervise her as she explores the new environment. It’s also best to try to set up her crate or sleeping area in the same way as they were to give her a feeling of familiarity.

Lastly, make sure you update her ID tag and microchip with her new address and contact number.

Happy moving!

For pet friendly air charters to make your relocation easier visit PetJets.com for a quote!

hiking

Five Awesome Things to Do When Out Hiking with Your Dog

Dog Hiking Adventures

Hiking alone in the mountains or prairies or other natural areas around your home brings with it a sense of solace and peace that can´t be found elsewhere. It can also, however, be somewhat lonely. If you love hiking but can´t find friends who are willing to hit the trail with you every weekend, finding parks and trails that are dog friendly is one way to feel accompanied while out enjoying the Great Outdoors. Not only is it satisfying to watch the energy and enthusiasm of your dog as he or she runs free through the natural wonders of Nature, but it will also boost your energy levels as you try and make it up that last hill.

If you love hiking with your dog and try to take advantage of every weekend to get your best buddy out of the house and into a place where he or she can burn off some excess energy, you need to know what to bring with you. Just like you, your dog might also feel tired at times and need some creature comforts to enjoy the time on the trail. Below we offer advice on the top five pieces of gear to bring with you when hiking with you dog.

A Dog Backpack

First and foremost, you need to let your little pal know that while you love having him or her on the trail with you, they need to pull their own weight as well. Water weighs 8 pounds a gallon, and unless you are hiking along a trail with several creeks along the way, your pack will most likely be pretty heavy with the water you´re toting around for you and your pup.

Fortunately, several outfitters have begun to make and market dog backpacks that fit snuggly onto your dog´s back so he or she can carry his or her own water and any other treats that they might want along the way. Instead of shopping the internet for hours, check out this post to help you find the best dog backpack.

Water Bowl

Of course, your dog´s backpack full of water isn´t much use unless you bring along a water dish as well. Trying to pour water into your own cupped hand so that Fido can get a drink or two is definitely not very efficient. Your regular water bowl at home, however, is probably too bulky and large to comfortably take along with you. There are several lightweight plastic dog dishes that can easily be fit into a backpack, either yours or your dogs.

Picture ID

Sometimes your little spunky one can get a little too excited while on the path, and who can blame him. After spending hours on end cooped up at home while you are out working, the feeling of freedom on the trail is understandably intoxicating. If your dog does get of his or her leash, or if she gets lost somewhere on the trail, you will want to have a picture ID with you to ask fellow hikers if they have seen your dog somewhere up the trail. Having a picture will help you to make sure that even if your pup does get lost, you will be able to find him or her quickly.

Insect Repellent and Tick Medicine

Even though dogs don´t usually get stung by mosquitoes and other pests on the trail, you might very well want to spray them down with a bit of your insect repellant so that they won´t have to deal with bugs buzzing around their head the entire length of the trail. If you live in an area where ticks are present, make sure to add a little bit of the tick medicine you use to keep your pup protected from lime disease and other dangerous diseases that come from tick bites. If you don´t like the chemical-based repellants, there are now several natural options made from essential oils that you can purchase.

Expandable Leash

If you are fortunate enough to live near a state park or recreation area where dogs are allowed to run wild, and if you trust your dog to stay by your side (mostly) while on the trail, you can leave the leash behind. If you run the risk of getting fined by the local ranger or don´t trust your dog to be loose, then you might want to bring along a leash. Instead of a short leash that will end up choking your poor pup, bring along an expandable leash so that you can allow him or her to explore the surroundings when no one else is around.

Enjoy the Natural World with Your Best Buddy

With these five essential pieces of gear you will be able to assure that every hiking trip with your dog will be a memorable one. And if you invest in a quality doggie backpack, you can let your dog carry his or her own weight while on the trail. If they´re strong enough, you might even consider letting your dog carry for you the bottle of wine that you and your partner wanted to enjoy once you make it to the overlook at the end of the trail.

Take your dog with you on your next vacation and air charter to your favorite with Pet Jets!