Traveling with your dog

Essential Trip Tips for Dog Owners

Traveling with your dog can make for a better experience for everyone. However, if you don’t plan well, it can end up adding more stress than it adds fun. Fortunately, a little careful preparation can go a long way. If you’re planning to bring your canine companion along on an upcoming trip, here are some essential tips to consider as you plan:

Opt for a vacation home.

Lodging is key when it comes to traveling with a dog, and it can be hard to find quality hotels that are pet-friendly. Even if you find a pet-friendly hotel, keeping your pup cooped up can lead to stress for everyone involved. Consider staying at a vacation home instead. Not only will a vacation property provide your dog with more space to run and play, it will also be quieter and less busy than a hotel, which will help keep your pup’s anxiety levels down.

When you’re looking at vacation rentals for you and your pup, be sure to check out spots in Orange County, California the home of Pet Jets. Turnkey notes this area has some of the best vacation destination activities, such as:

  • Hiking at Bommer Canyon and Quail Hill Trailhead in Irvine
  • Beach bumming in Newport Beach, Laguna Beach and Huntington Beach
  • Walking beach trails amidst breathtaking views in San Clemente

Make sure they have identification.

No matter what type of dog you have, they need to have identification. Even the most diligent and cautious dog owners are at risk of their dog getting away from time to time. Make sure your pup has either an ID tag on their collar—complete with their name, your name and phone number—or a microchip implanted by their veterinarian. And if you want to be extra safe, do both.

Make sure they have a crate.

If you have a smaller dog, it’s important to bring a crate along on the trip, as it will help to keep them safe. This is true whether you’re traveling by car or plane (they’re actually required for commercial flights). The crate should be large enough for your pup to stand and turn around, and it should have a leak-proof bottom. It should also have ventilation on both sides, as well as a “Live Animal” sticker that provides your contact information. To increase your dog’s comfort, consider lining the interior of the crate with a favorite blanket and adding a couple of toys.

Don’t shatter your dog’s routine.

One thing that can cause your dog to stress out quickly while traveling is when you drastically change their routine. Breaking up your routine is part of the appeal of vacationing, but when it comes to your pup, they don’t really see it that way.

While you may not be able to maintain their entire routine, try your best to stick with the essentials. For instance, feed them at the same times each day, make sure they get their walks in, and make sure they’re able to play like they normally would. Actually, vacation time is perfect for extra play time! Keeping the important parts of your dog’s routine intact will help keep them happy throughout the trip. There’s no better way to add some joy to your traveling experience than bringing your pup along with you. To help ensure a good time for everyone, be sure to consider renting out a vacation home rather than a hotel. Also, make sure your dog has adequate identification, as well as a crate if necessary. Finally, try to keep the essential parts of your dog’s routine intact so that they can be less anxious and enjoy their time. Remember that putting the extra effort into planning your trip will likely end up paying off for everyone.

Flying with Your Pets

5 Tips When Flying with Your Pets

I got my pet for one primary reason: To have an outdoor companion! She’s an 8-year old golden retriever who loves to frolic in lush forests and endlessly swim in cold ocean waters.

However, when the all-too-familiar nearby trails and beaches become a tad bit boring, your itchy feet can take you to other places which will require flying. This circumstance then raises the most critical yet horrifying question: Where should you leave your pets?

Sure, there are 5-star vet hotels, your willing friends who can babysit (or petsit), or you can always leave them home for the time being – alone and lonely. Although it might not matter the world to you, this is already a big deal for your pet companions, maybe even traumatic for some animals.

So before you think about leaving your pets behind on probably the most exciting adventure in your life, here are five tips that you need to prepare when flying with your pets.

1. Call the most pet-friendly airline in town.

Our pets are part of the family. And when it comes to their safety, you should only trust the best airline company when handling them. Check which ones are the most pet-friendly airlines through online reviews and recommendations. Then check what type of aircraft you’ll be flying in. More often than not, a smaller aircraft will have size limits.

Moreover, don’t be frugal when choosing an airline. High-cost airlines are a better option than budget airlines at this point. Remember, your pets’ safety is the utmost priority when flying. If unable to find an airline option, consider a pet friendly air charter with Pet Jets!

2. Check if your pets are fit to fly.

Airlines and veterinarians advise that puppies not more than eight weeks old, older dogs, or sick dogs shouldn’t be fit to fly. Also, some breeds of dogs with a short snout like pugs, boxers, or bullmastiffs are susceptible to heatstroke, especially when placed in the cargo area of an airplane. More importantly, pets that have a bad temperament, meaning those that bite or are not accustomed to people, are better off staying put.

3. See if you can fly your pets in cabins.

Most airlines offer either flying your pets in cabins as carry-on luggage or as cargo. Although the former seems to be a much safer route, some airlines usually impose a 20-pound pet weight limit for in-cabin pet flights. So if your pets can fit under your seat, then you can keep an eye on them throughout the flight which will give you peace of mind. As for cargo flying, check if your pets are mentally and physically healthy enough to endure hours of seclusion.

4. Accustom your dogs to a crate before flying.

Most airlines require a large crate for your pets. It’s recommended that you accustom your pets to a crate a few weeks before the fly date so it can feel comfortable and calm inside the crate. Practice driving your pets around while inside a crate so they can get used to motion sickness.

5. Wear your dog out hours before flying.

Take your dog out for a walk, or a run a few hours before flying to burn off the excess energy. This allows them to rest better and remain calm during the entire flight. Always make sure to have a water bottle clipped on the crate. If you think your pets are better off sedated throughout the flight, consult your dog’s veterinarian for the right dosage.

Wrap Up

Spending time in the outdoors with your furry companions is a perfect bonding moment that will solidify that pet-human love and connection. When you reach your destination, it’s crucial to have the most suitable gear and equipment for safety as well. Last but not least, have the best time with your adorable pets!

Author Bio:

Sarah Brooks is a passionate travel & outdoor blogger who loves to travel and write about her experience. She is currently working with Pursuing Outdoor, which offers ultimate guides and tips on fishing, outdoor, survival, bushcraft, and hunting. Click here for more info about outdoor tips, guides and more.

moving with your dogs

Moving with your dogs: make moving day an easy day with these tips!

Moving is a stressful experience, both for us and our dogs. Imagine how it feels among the chaos of boxes and shouting humans for someone who can’t be told what is happening. There is no exact science on how to make moving day seamless, but you can follow these tips to keep your stress levels down and your dog’s anxiety under control.


Have a special dog box
Keeping your pet comfortable during the processes of loading up boxes and moving out belongings means you should have items readily available that your dog will need. Have a dedicated box for your dog’s travel items, including:

  • Dog food
  • Water bowl
  • Favorite toys
  • Familiar bedding
  • Leash
  • Collar
  • Any necessary medication

The bedding and toys will smell like home. When you’re ready to climb into the car, you can readily unpack them and nestle them next to your companion to keep him comforted.


Keep your dog away from the action
Moving day can be overwhelming for a dog watching movers and his family scrambling around to pack boxes and load them onto a moving truck. Consider having someone look after your dog for the day. A pet sitter will cost you between $10 and $65 for the day, depending on your location and what services the sitter offers. You can also recruit a family member or friend to watch him. A loved one may not accept payment for dog sitting, but a thank-you note and a gift card is always a welcome token of thanks!
If your pooch must stay with you on the big day, dedicate a room that they are able to stay in while the chaos ensues. Give them their favorite blanket, some toys, a water bowl and a few treats so they know this is their safe space. Put a sign on the door that says “Do not open” so that strangers in the house (your movers, for example) don’t accidentally open the door and let your dog run out into the uncontrolled environment. Finally, as busy as you might be, check up on your dog regularly during moving day.


Prepare for the drive
The drive is often the most difficult part of moving day. Many dogs are unaccustomed to car rides and will feel anxious during the trip. Make sure you purchase anti-car sickness medication ahead of time. If your pup is especially prone to anxiety, talk to your vet about a sedative that can make the journey as smooth as possible. This type of medication will help your dog relax and feel more at ease with all the activity going on around him.
You should also purchase safe, sturdy travel equipment for your dog, like a harness and seat belt or a crate that can easily be strapped in the car. Barkpost.com suggests that you put together or purchase a doggy first-aid kit as well.


Be cautious upon arrival
When you arrive at your new home, don’t just swing the vehicle doors open and let your dog run out. Make sure you have a plan in place to let him out of the car. He could very easily get overexcited or overwhelmed, make a break for it, and get lost in his new, unfamiliar surroundings. Monitor your dog to watch for any allergies he may develop in his new environment. If you notice your dog is itching or has red skin, he could be allergic to something in or outside the home. If this is the case, your vet may recommend medication or even a diet change.
If you’re able to, hire a maid to deep clean your home before you move in. This will help remove the scents of the people and things that were in the home before, which can be confusing to your fuzzy friend. A prescreening service like HomeAdvisor can help you find trustworthy help in your area so you’ll have one less thing to worry about during your move. For example, a deep cleaning in Anaheim, CA you can expect to pay between $109 and $217. Throughout the process, make sure your family members, your movers, and anybody else lending a hand are on the same page with regards to your dog and his safety. Moving is stressful for people and pooches alike, but with some careful planning, you can make the journey a successful one.

For long distance moves, consider a pet friendly air charter with Pet Jets! Pets fly in the cabin with you which makes your relocation less stressful for you and your pets. Click here for an online quote today!

Travel Safely with Your Dog

How to Travel Safely With Your Dog

If you love pets, you must admit that any trip you make without your dog is no fun. However, traveling with your dog can be hectic-whether by plane, road or train. You need to make some arrangements to ensure your furry friend is safe and comfortable.

Remember, your dog will feel comfortable at home than when you can him along and you cannot guarantee him the comfort he deserves.

If you have decided to travel with your dog, dogproductpicker has some tips to help you to make you and your dog safe and comfortable during your trip.

Important: Always ensure to microchip your dog, put a collar on her neck, plus a tag with your name and phone number written in it.

travel safely with your dog

When Traveling By Plane.

Before you book your ticket, you will want to ask the airline some questions, especially if you want your dog to fly in the cabin. Well, if your dog is small to fit under your seat.

Here are important questions to ask.

  • Will the airline allow you to carry your dog in the cabin?
  • Are there specific immunization requirements
  • Will you be required to carry your dog in a specific type of carrier? Usually, soft-sided or hard-sided carriers are acceptable by most airlines
  • If the airline does not allow you to carry your dog with you in the cabin, does it have a safe place for your furry friend?

Here are the tips to travel with your dog safely by plane.

Plan a Prior Checkup of Your Dog

Some days before your trip, take your dog for a checkup by your pet’s vet. This is to ensure your dog gets the latest vaccinations. You will also need to get a health certification. Never tranquilize your dog at that time since it might affect his breathing. Just ask your vet to recommend some ways to relax your dog since not all dogs are comfortable to be carried in a plane.

Buy Approved Crates

You need to buy a special crate where your dog will be comfortable to sit, stand or turn around. The crate should have bedding and shredded paper to prevent your dog against hitting. In this case, you will need to buy a USDA-approved shipping crate.

You may also want to carry some dried food somewhere the airline personnel can feed your dog during long flights.

Mark theCrate

You will also need to mark the crate so that the airline personnel can know what’s inside the crate. Include your name, phone number, and your travel destination. Some people include a photo of their dog on the crate.

Let Every Airline Employee Know that Your Dog is in the Cargo

Your dog needs to be safe and attended if possible during your trip. For that reason, you need to tell all the airline employees you are traveling with and those on the ground that your dog is in the cargo hold, especially if you are not carrying him under your seat.

When Traveling by Road.

It’s easy to travel by road with your dog but you have to make some preparations as well. There are things to consider, keeping your dog safe and comfortable.

Restrain Your Dog

You should not allow your dog to roam in the car. Here, you need to purchase a crate and anchor securely in your car’s seat. This way your dog will not roam around the car. Some accidents are caused when the driver is distracted and your dog can distract you when he starts to roam around.

Do Not Put Your Dog in the Front Seat

The front seat is meant for humans. The safest and best way to travel with your dog is to put him in the back seat of the car.

Lastly, Prevent Your Dog from Sticking His Head out to the Window.

Your dog’s head and body should be inside the car and not outside the window. Also, do not travel with your dog in an open truck or pickup. Well, this list is not comprehensive since there are many other ways to travel with your dog safely. Ensure to find out more before you start your trip.

This article was sponsored by Pet Jets! Consider chartering a pet friendly aircraft for your next vacation, relocation, or even business trip!h

Canine Influenza

What Is a Canine Influenza or Dog Flu? Do You Have to Worry about It When Your Dog Is Traveling with You?

Canine influenza, or in simple words, dog flu is a respiratory and highly contagious disease found in dogs. This new disease was first seen in the United States in 2004. The virus caused the death of Greyhound dogs at the race track in New Jersey and since then it has become infamous in the canine world. The responsible virus behind canine influenza is H3N8. However, another strain of the virus, H3N2 emerged afterward. Both the virus can make canines sick badly and cause the deaths if not provided with proper medical attention.

Even though canine influenza makes frequent appearances in news, fortunately, the virus is not that widespread and does not affect each and every dog and kill. Most importantly, it can be prevented by the precautions. If you’re traveling to another state or country, you will have to look at how prevalent the canine flu is in that place. Moreover, it is crucial to know how the disease spreads, where your dog is prone to get infected, and how to keep your dog safe from the virus.

How Canine Influenza Spreads

Just like mammalian influenza spreads among humans through a respiratory medium, dog flu spreads by the droplets that contain nasal secretion when a dog sniffs, barks, licks, or shares their things with other dogs. It also spreads if you caress your pooch after touching an influenza-infected doggie.

That said, dog flu can spread through water and food bowls, collars, harnesses, or clothes of infected canines, public dog water drinking, kennels, shelters, pet boarding, walking, and sitting services where many dogs gather and likely to contract influenza virus.

Canine flu virus can live up to 48 hours on any surface, 24 hours on clothing, and 12 hours on hands. Only 80% of infected pooches show symptoms of the disease while the rest still can spread the virus so you can never say the dog is infected or not by his general well-being. Laboratory tests are the only way to diagnose the disease. Moreover, dogs are most contagious during the virus incubation period which is 2-8 days and still, there will be no symptoms at all in the infected dog and might be shedding the virus everywhere he goes.

What Are the Signs You Should Care For

When it’s time for your most awaited holidays you never want to think your pooch has already contracted the virus and you will be immersed in taking care of your sick doggie and taking him to vet in a foreign place.

So before you fly, if your dog is showing symptoms similar to a kennel cough it warrants a vet visit. Dog flu has similar symptoms that a kennel cough would induce- soft, dry cough or a moist cough. Moreover, these symptoms won’t disappear till 10 to 21 days despite being on cough suppressants and other antibiotics. There are few other symptoms which may accompany a dog such as sneezing, nasal and/or oculus discharge.  Mostly, nasal discharge happens due to secondary bacterial infection.

The severe cases are those when canines start exhibiting the clinical signs of pneumonia. A high-grade fever (104°F to 106°F) and increased respiratory rate are the symptoms you will see. Although most canines recover without incidents, there are cases of deaths reported due to H3N2.

If even a single sign appears in your pooch, you should pay a visit to the vet office. Your vet might instruct you to keep him in your car as he can shed influenza virus to other dogs in the office if at all he is infected. Moreover, there’s no season of canine influenza, it can produce acute infections at any time of the year.

A Little Bit about Preventive Measures

Before you take off, don’t miss to read these preventive measures to keep your pooch safe from canine influenza. We have discussed earlier that your dog is prone to the virus where dogs congregate. Go to your vet and ask him about how prevalent the disease is in the place you’re visiting.

Make sure you are using a soundproof crate for your dog if you are traveling by airway. This will help your dog to relax and calm while jet engines rev.

It might be inconvenient to take all of your dog’s things, for example, his/her favorite plush dog bed, leash, harness, toys, and each and everything he uses at home but you will thank yourself for bringing his own things, especially, food bowls and water bowls. In a nutshell, don’t let your pooch use other doggies’ things and share his own things with them. Your pooch is likely to catch flu at places like dog parks, beaches, and every place where dogs gather in large number. So try to avoid visiting those places with your dog. If your pooch is not going to accompany you then give your pet sitter strict instructions about the preventive measures. Bookmark Pet Jets and visit us again for pet health articles related to flying.