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Dog-proofing

Why Dog-Proofing is Essential for Any New Owner

Dogs are naturally inquisitive. They love to explore new environments – mainly by chewing, licking and sniffing.

Unfortunately, the average home is filled with potential dangers. Some are obvious, such as toxic cleaning chemicals or gaps in a fence, but others are easy to overlook.

Dog-proofing

It’s important to thoroughly check your house for dangers before you bring a new dog home. Here are a few examples of dangers that are often missed:

  • Toilet Bowls. You should always keep the toilet lid down, as cleaning chemicals are toxic if your dog drinks from the bowl. Small puppies are also at risk of getting trapped in the water.
  • Food Waste. Dogs love the smell of food waste – but it often contains poisonous foods or dangerous mould. Keep food decomposition bins in a locked cupboard.
  • Power Cables. Soft cables can be an attractive chewing target for a puppy in the teething stage. All cables should either by hidden or protected.
  • Toxic Houseplants. Many common plants are toxic to dogs. These include sago palm, azaleas, and jade. Check all plants before bringing your dog home.

If you want to learn more about this topic, The Dog Clinic has put together a complete guide to dog-proofing a house. It includes tips for kitchens, living rooms, bathrooms, gardens, garages and more. To learn more about dog tips and air charter for your pets, visit PetJets.com.

Preventing Dog Disasters

Preventing Dog Disasters: Introducing Your Dog to Your Neighbors

While you may think your canine friend is compatible with everyone, some people are afraid of dogs. Others have had traumatic or negative experiences, and others don’t value pets at all. If you want to keep friendly relations with your neighbors, you’ll need to employ proper dog etiquette around your home to keep them happy and your dog content. 

Introducing Your Dog to Others to Prevent Dog Bites

There are about 4.5 million dog bites reported in the U.S. each year, according to the CDC. There’s no guarantee that something about your neighbor or his home won’t trigger your pet. There are some ways you can prevent dog bites. Before introducing your dog to your neighbors, talk to them. Ask if they are allergic to dogs or if they like dogs. Some will be welcoming, but others may be cautious. Keep in mind that if your neighbor has an allergy, it’s likely that they will not be able to come into your home.

If this is not an issue, a formal introduction can be made while your dog is leashed. Make sure to approach your neighbor slowly and tell your him what makes your dog anxious and likely to bark.

Some additional precautions you can take are:

  • Be careful with children who don’t understand that any dog can bite. This can be an even bigger problem if the child already has a dog because the interaction they are used to will be unfamiliar to your dog. Make sure these meetings are supervised and teach the child what to expect. The American Kennel Club has a safety booklet called “The Dog Listener” (PDF) filled with kid-friendly instructions and activities.
  • At the first sign of any unusual behavior or aggression from your dog, don’t wait. The ASPCA recommends you “seek professional help from a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB), a veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB), or a qualified Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT).” Read their page “Behavioral Help for Your Pet.”
  • Install a fence around your home to keep your dog out of your neighbor’s yard. According to HomeAdvisor, the average price to install a wooden fence in Huntington Beach ranges from $1,787 – $4,025.

Proper Care of Your Dog

Taking proper care of your dog will prevent others from fearing him. Be sure to follow these rules:

  • Groom your dog regularly. Smelly and dirty dogs can bring unpleasant stereotypes to mind.
  • Keep your pet up to date with rabies vaccinations. This preventative measure is the law in most states and will put you at ease should something happen.
  • Treat your dog to prevent fleas, ticks, and other parasites, as well as taking him for regular checkups. Quarantine him when sick or medicated as his personality may change.
  • Spay or neuter your dog as soon as you can so they’ll be less likely to bite. Some animal organizations may offer to do this for free, or you can expect to pay between $50 and $125 at a low-cost clinic.
  • Walk and exercise your dog in your neighborhood regularly. This will help him learn proper interaction with others including strange dogs.
  • Hire a certified professional dog trainer to train your dog (a 90-minute, in-home lesson can cost you $225). Get recommendations from friends to ensure the training is humane. 
  • If your dog is experiencing uncontrolled barking, seek help right away. While you do, talk to your neighbors to proactively prevent any ill will.

Dogs are a welcome part of many families. Make sure your dog welcomes your neighbors, too. Check back on our blog for future pet moving tips with Pet Jets!

Traveling with your dog

Essential Trip Tips for Dog Owners

Traveling with your dog can make for a better experience for everyone. However, if you don’t plan well, it can end up adding more stress than it adds fun. Fortunately, a little careful preparation can go a long way. If you’re planning to bring your canine companion along on an upcoming trip, here are some essential tips to consider as you plan:

Opt for a vacation home.

Lodging is key when it comes to traveling with a dog, and it can be hard to find quality hotels that are pet-friendly. Even if you find a pet-friendly hotel, keeping your pup cooped up can lead to stress for everyone involved. Consider staying at a vacation home instead. Not only will a vacation property provide your dog with more space to run and play, it will also be quieter and less busy than a hotel, which will help keep your pup’s anxiety levels down.

When you’re looking at vacation rentals for you and your pup, be sure to check out spots in Orange County, California the home of Pet Jets. Turnkey notes this area has some of the best vacation destination activities, such as:

  • Hiking at Bommer Canyon and Quail Hill Trailhead in Irvine
  • Beach bumming in Newport Beach, Laguna Beach and Huntington Beach
  • Walking beach trails amidst breathtaking views in San Clemente

Make sure they have identification.

No matter what type of dog you have, they need to have identification. Even the most diligent and cautious dog owners are at risk of their dog getting away from time to time. Make sure your pup has either an ID tag on their collar—complete with their name, your name and phone number—or a microchip implanted by their veterinarian. And if you want to be extra safe, do both.

Make sure they have a crate.

If you have a smaller dog, it’s important to bring a crate along on the trip, as it will help to keep them safe. This is true whether you’re traveling by car or plane (they’re actually required for commercial flights). The crate should be large enough for your pup to stand and turn around, and it should have a leak-proof bottom. It should also have ventilation on both sides, as well as a “Live Animal” sticker that provides your contact information. To increase your dog’s comfort, consider lining the interior of the crate with a favorite blanket and adding a couple of toys.

Don’t shatter your dog’s routine.

One thing that can cause your dog to stress out quickly while traveling is when you drastically change their routine. Breaking up your routine is part of the appeal of vacationing, but when it comes to your pup, they don’t really see it that way.

While you may not be able to maintain their entire routine, try your best to stick with the essentials. For instance, feed them at the same times each day, make sure they get their walks in, and make sure they’re able to play like they normally would. Actually, vacation time is perfect for extra play time! Keeping the important parts of your dog’s routine intact will help keep them happy throughout the trip. There’s no better way to add some joy to your traveling experience than bringing your pup along with you. To help ensure a good time for everyone, be sure to consider renting out a vacation home rather than a hotel. Also, make sure your dog has adequate identification, as well as a crate if necessary. Finally, try to keep the essential parts of your dog’s routine intact so that they can be less anxious and enjoy their time. Remember that putting the extra effort into planning your trip will likely end up paying off for everyone.

Flying with Your Pets

5 Tips When Flying with Your Pets

I got my pet for one primary reason: To have an outdoor companion! She’s an 8-year old golden retriever who loves to frolic in lush forests and endlessly swim in cold ocean waters.

However, when the all-too-familiar nearby trails and beaches become a tad bit boring, your itchy feet can take you to other places which will require flying. This circumstance then raises the most critical yet horrifying question: Where should you leave your pets?

Sure, there are 5-star vet hotels, your willing friends who can babysit (or petsit), or you can always leave them home for the time being – alone and lonely. Although it might not matter the world to you, this is already a big deal for your pet companions, maybe even traumatic for some animals.

So before you think about leaving your pets behind on probably the most exciting adventure in your life, here are five tips that you need to prepare when flying with your pets.

1. Call the most pet-friendly airline in town.

Our pets are part of the family. And when it comes to their safety, you should only trust the best airline company when handling them. Check which ones are the most pet-friendly airlines through online reviews and recommendations. Then check what type of aircraft you’ll be flying in. More often than not, a smaller aircraft will have size limits.

Moreover, don’t be frugal when choosing an airline. High-cost airlines are a better option than budget airlines at this point. Remember, your pets’ safety is the utmost priority when flying. If unable to find an airline option, consider a pet friendly air charter with Pet Jets!

2. Check if your pets are fit to fly.

Airlines and veterinarians advise that puppies not more than eight weeks old, older dogs, or sick dogs shouldn’t be fit to fly. Also, some breeds of dogs with a short snout like pugs, boxers, or bullmastiffs are susceptible to heatstroke, especially when placed in the cargo area of an airplane. More importantly, pets that have a bad temperament, meaning those that bite or are not accustomed to people, are better off staying put.

3. See if you can fly your pets in cabins.

Most airlines offer either flying your pets in cabins as carry-on luggage or as cargo. Although the former seems to be a much safer route, some airlines usually impose a 20-pound pet weight limit for in-cabin pet flights. So if your pets can fit under your seat, then you can keep an eye on them throughout the flight which will give you peace of mind. As for cargo flying, check if your pets are mentally and physically healthy enough to endure hours of seclusion.

4. Accustom your dogs to a crate before flying.

Most airlines require a large crate for your pets. It’s recommended that you accustom your pets to a crate a few weeks before the fly date so it can feel comfortable and calm inside the crate. Practice driving your pets around while inside a crate so they can get used to motion sickness.

5. Wear your dog out hours before flying.

Take your dog out for a walk, or a run a few hours before flying to burn off the excess energy. This allows them to rest better and remain calm during the entire flight. Always make sure to have a water bottle clipped on the crate. If you think your pets are better off sedated throughout the flight, consult your dog’s veterinarian for the right dosage.

Wrap Up

Spending time in the outdoors with your furry companions is a perfect bonding moment that will solidify that pet-human love and connection. When you reach your destination, it’s crucial to have the most suitable gear and equipment for safety as well. Last but not least, have the best time with your adorable pets!

Author Bio:

Sarah Brooks is a passionate travel & outdoor blogger who loves to travel and write about her experience. She is currently working with Pursuing Outdoor, which offers ultimate guides and tips on fishing, outdoor, survival, bushcraft, and hunting. Click here for more info about outdoor tips, guides and more.

moving with your dogs

Moving with your dogs: make moving day an easy day with these tips!

Moving is a stressful experience, both for us and our dogs. Imagine how it feels among the chaos of boxes and shouting humans for someone who can’t be told what is happening. There is no exact science on how to make moving day seamless, but you can follow these tips to keep your stress levels down and your dog’s anxiety under control.


Have a special dog box
Keeping your pet comfortable during the processes of loading up boxes and moving out belongings means you should have items readily available that your dog will need. Have a dedicated box for your dog’s travel items, including:

  • Dog food
  • Water bowl
  • Favorite toys
  • Familiar bedding
  • Leash
  • Collar
  • Any necessary medication

The bedding and toys will smell like home. When you’re ready to climb into the car, you can readily unpack them and nestle them next to your companion to keep him comforted.


Keep your dog away from the action
Moving day can be overwhelming for a dog watching movers and his family scrambling around to pack boxes and load them onto a moving truck. Consider having someone look after your dog for the day. A pet sitter will cost you between $10 and $65 for the day, depending on your location and what services the sitter offers. You can also recruit a family member or friend to watch him. A loved one may not accept payment for dog sitting, but a thank-you note and a gift card is always a welcome token of thanks!
If your pooch must stay with you on the big day, dedicate a room that they are able to stay in while the chaos ensues. Give them their favorite blanket, some toys, a water bowl and a few treats so they know this is their safe space. Put a sign on the door that says “Do not open” so that strangers in the house (your movers, for example) don’t accidentally open the door and let your dog run out into the uncontrolled environment. Finally, as busy as you might be, check up on your dog regularly during moving day.


Prepare for the drive
The drive is often the most difficult part of moving day. Many dogs are unaccustomed to car rides and will feel anxious during the trip. Make sure you purchase anti-car sickness medication ahead of time. If your pup is especially prone to anxiety, talk to your vet about a sedative that can make the journey as smooth as possible. This type of medication will help your dog relax and feel more at ease with all the activity going on around him.
You should also purchase safe, sturdy travel equipment for your dog, like a harness and seat belt or a crate that can easily be strapped in the car. Barkpost.com suggests that you put together or purchase a doggy first-aid kit as well.


Be cautious upon arrival
When you arrive at your new home, don’t just swing the vehicle doors open and let your dog run out. Make sure you have a plan in place to let him out of the car. He could very easily get overexcited or overwhelmed, make a break for it, and get lost in his new, unfamiliar surroundings. Monitor your dog to watch for any allergies he may develop in his new environment. If you notice your dog is itching or has red skin, he could be allergic to something in or outside the home. If this is the case, your vet may recommend medication or even a diet change.
If you’re able to, hire a maid to deep clean your home before you move in. This will help remove the scents of the people and things that were in the home before, which can be confusing to your fuzzy friend. A prescreening service like HomeAdvisor can help you find trustworthy help in your area so you’ll have one less thing to worry about during your move. For example, a deep cleaning in Anaheim, CA you can expect to pay between $109 and $217. Throughout the process, make sure your family members, your movers, and anybody else lending a hand are on the same page with regards to your dog and his safety. Moving is stressful for people and pooches alike, but with some careful planning, you can make the journey a successful one.

For long distance moves, consider a pet friendly air charter with Pet Jets! Pets fly in the cabin with you which makes your relocation less stressful for you and your pets. Click here for an online quote today!